Going Changes Lives

When you hear your church or an organization talk about taking a mission trip, whether a few days to a couple of weeks, does something in your spirit tug at you to go? You hear about the work they may be doing, the difference it can make, and the opportunities it will provide. It pulls at your compassion, and you consider your options. And too often, I hear of people changing their mind, making up excuses, or just do not get signed up. And honestly, they miss a blessing.

I am reminded of many in the Bible who said “yes” to God when He called them. In particular, I think of Abraham when God said to him in Genesis 12:1, “Now the LORD had said to Abram: “Get out of your country, from your family and from your father’s house to a land that I will show you.”

Can you imagine going somewhere blindly without really knowing what will happen next? But in reality, we do that every day of our lives. We do not know what the day will bring so all we can do is simply be on mission where we are and let God direct our path.

However, when you go on mission, take a mission opportunity, say “yes” to God, I have learned going really does change lives. Not only to those I minister and care for, but I am changed.


When disasters strike and Kentucky disaster relief volunteers respond, there are some things I have noticed. And this is true with anytime we go on mission.

God Takes Us to the Unfamliar.
Every time I respond to a disaster; every time I go on a mission trip; every time I say “yes, I’ll go,” God takes me to unfamiliar places. There are new people to meet, new sites to see, new opportunities to experience, new skills to learn and so much more. And He changes me.

God Shows Us the Unexpected.
I have learned no mission trip has ever gone as planned. The reason: I am not in control. God is. I have experienced tire trouble in a strange town only to have an unexpected encounter to have a gospel conversation. I have seen God set up divine appointments with someone that only God could schedule. I have had people come up to me at a gas station asking for prayer or for a Bible which opened doors for ministry. All completely unexpected. I am reminded, I am not in control, God is and in unexpected ways, places and time. And He changes me.

God Teaches Us the Understanding.
When Jesus was washing the disciples’ feet in John 13, He said to Peter in vs. 7, “Jesus answered and said to him, “What I am doing you do not understand now, but you will know after this.” There are so many times in the going and even in the doing I do not understand the why. But I have learned to trust and know God will show me. Not always in my time, but His. And as He teaches me, understanding comes. And when the understanding comes, He changes me.

The next time God tugs at your heart calling and compelling you to go on mission for Him, will you take that step? Will you say “yes?”

Let God take you to the unfamiliar, show you the unexpected, and teach you the understanding. And I promise you, your going will change you. He changed me.

It’s Time to Pray

As we have all watched Hurricane Ian make landfall on the news and weather stations, there is no doubt a stirring in our hearts for those affected by this massive storm. We are all amazed at the magnitude of this storm, the power it has to create such destruction, and the amount of rain it has produced. Once again, our hearts hurt with those who are hurting.

Southern Baptists are mobilizing to bring help, hope and healing to those who are hurting. Feeding operations are currently being set up and operating. Mobile shower units, recovery units, chaplains, support equipment and more are being sent to provide for the needs of people.

It’s time to pray.

It’s time to pray for those who have been directly affected by this devastating storm. Many have lost loved ones or their homes. Many have lost their jobs and belonging. It’s time we pray for them that their immediate and long-term needs are met.

It’s time to pray for those who are mobilizing to bring help to provide meals, clean up the debris, and restore needed resources. It’s time to pray for their safety as they travel and work.

It’s time to pray for financial support to come to purchase supplies, food, water, fuel, household items and more. The needs will be enormous. It’s time to pray how you can give to support the relief efforts.

It’s time to pray that even in the midst of this destruction, God would open doors of opportunity to have gospel conversations with those who are asking “why?” Southern Baptist chaplains are mobilizing to care for the emotional and spiritual well being of those who are hurting.

It’s time to pray for the local churches who have been affected and the pastors who are caring for their congregations. The needs will be great. It’s time to pray for churches who can partner with churches to lend support and make a cooperative kingdom impact.

It’s time to pray that the God of heaven will bring a revival to this land. As big and powerful as this storm has proven to be, our God is bigger still. May we cry out to Him to meet our need.

It’s time to pray.

Answer me when I call to you, my righteous God. Give me relief from my distress; have mercy on me and hear my prayer. Psalm 4:1

The Hardest Work You’ll Ever Love

I have often joked and laughed about the three rules of a handyman. First is to contemplate what to do. Then you contemplate on how to do it. And finally, you just contemplate.

How many times have you followed those three rules without even realizing it? There are many times I have projects I either really don’t know how to do, or I’m just trying to think through the best way to do it. Or it’s a really hard or dirty job and I don’t want to do it, so I keep putting it off.

Yet there is something completely different when it comes to serving through the Kentucky Baptist Disaster Relief ministry. It is interesting how we will go places, serve with people we’ve never met, and sleep in strange places on cots or air mattresses. We will also go into homes which have been destroyed by water and mud (which is a smell all its own), dangers we would typically avoid, and work harder and longer than we ever would at home. But we love it.

It is the hardest work you’ll ever love.

This work doesn’t make sense to most people. And honestly, sometimes it doesn’t make sense to me. So, I began to ask, “why is this?” And I was reminded of several things.

It is a motivation from God.
It is an obedience thing. As I look through Scripture, God is always using someone to care for others. God can meet needs by the very words of His mouth. But He chooses to use people to love and care for people. So, God calls His people. He stirs in the hearts of His people. And we respond to His call. We bring help.

It is a model of Jesus Christ
The main reason I am so passionate about the disaster relief ministry is how it models the ministry of Jesus Christ when He walked this earth. He saw a need. He compassionately did something to meet the need. And He had opportunity to tell them about the hope they can have through Him. Disaster relief does the same thing. People have a physical need. We see their need. We are moved with compassion to meet their need, and it opens the door for gospel conversations. We bring hope.

It is a ministry of compassion
When you see people hurting who have lost everything, they don’t know what to do. Their physical world had been destroyed, and it leaves them emotionally and spiritually numb. We can come alongside those who are hurting and care for them. Listen to them. Spend time with them. Hear their stories and let them grieve and we often cry with them. We bring healing.

It is a mission of the Church
The Great Commission commands the church (us) to go into all the world. It does not tell us to proclaim the world come to us, rather we are to go to them. I have seen many people get out of the pew and into the field through disaster relief.

The beauty of all of this is it requires people of all skill sets. This ministry requires good leaders, those who can manage people, assign work projects, and oversee a specific area. It requires those with good organizational skills. Those who can cook (we love our cooks!). Those who have good mechanical skills for set up of equipment, repairs, and resources. Those who do not mind getting dirty and willing to work hard. Those who have the gift of evangelism. Those who just want to serve. And the list goes on. God has a place for anyone He calls.

It is an evangelistic opportunity
Evangelism and missions always go together. You cannot be on mission without a focus on evangelism, otherwise why do it? You cannot evangelize without being on mission because that is the calling and purpose. Jesus said He came to this earth to seek and to save (evangelize). Yet, when you look at His method, He was on mission as He cared for those who were hurting. He met their physical need and sought to meet their spiritual need.

It IS the hardest work you will ever love.

You can learn more about the Kentucky Disaster Relief ministry at www.kybaptist.org/dr. Also visit www.kybaptist.org/flood to learn of opportunities to serve in eastern Kentucky with the flood response and rebuild.





The Blessing of Serving

The Bible is full of illustrations of numerous people who served the Lord for the sake of the gospel. Jesus Himself came not to be served but to serve. (Luke 22:24-27). Jesus was our greatest example of servanthood, but we find many more such as: Paul, Peter, Andrew, Barnabas, Timothy, Mary, and the list goes on. Each one of these had a different personality and giftedness and expressed it in their unique way.


It reminds me of the words Peter, “As each has received a gift, use it to serve one another, as good stewards of God’s varied grace: whoever speaks, as one who speaks oracles of God; whoever serves, as one who serves by the strength that God supplies—in order that in everything God may be glorified through Jesus Christ. To him belong glory and dominion forever and ever. Amen.” (1 Peter 4:10-11).

As I think about the blessing of serving, four things come to mind.

Serving Requires Sacrifice.
Any time we serve others, it requires a sacrifice on our part in some way. It may be our time, our resources, our finances, our talents, our abilities, or in other ways. It will always take effort and sacrifice when serving others.

Serving Removes Self.
When we serve others, our attention shifts from self to others. Our focus is turned to the one of whom we are serving rather than on ourselves. It develops a completely different focus and purpose. Rather than always seeking to serve our own needs, we discover we find joy in serving and caring for others.

Serving Reveals the Savior.
We are no more like Christ than when we are serving others. Isn’t that what He came to do? Wasn’t that the whole focus on His ministry? And ultimately, He served us by providing our salvation through His death on the cross. He sacrificed. He focused on others. Our sacrificial serving others models the ministry of Jesus. May we serve so others will see Jesus.

Serving Releases the Spirit.
When we are willing to sacrifice in some way, focus our attention on others rather than ourselves, and truly desire to reveal the Savior, the Spirit of God is released to show us great and mighty things. How many times have we learned we are not in control, but He is? He will orchestrate things, moments, situations, conversations and more to show us more of Him. And we simply stand in awe.

As I watch the Kentucky Baptist Disaster Relief volunteers, they model the ministry of Jesus. They so often sacrifice their time, resources, abilities, vacations, and more because they love to serve. The reason they love to serve, is they have experienced the blessing of serving.

They realize when the focus is no longer on self and now focused on the Savior, the power of the Holy Spirit is released to show us amazing things. Life changing moments. Eternal differences.

Learn how you too can become a Kentucky Disaster Relief volunteer at www.kybaptist.org/dr.

Thank you, Kentucky Baptist Disaster Relief Volunteers

Every Christian is called to be on mission for the sake of the Gospel. His call may vary from person to person; however, we are all called and commissioned to go into all the world and proclaim the Gospel. Being a Christian is not just about who we are, (or Who’s we are), but also what we are to be. We are to be just like Jesus Christ.

The Bible challenges us, What does it profit, my brethren, if someone says he has faith but does not have works? Can faith save him? If a brother or sister is naked and destitute of daily food, and one of you says to them, “Depart in peace, be warmed and filled,” but you do not give them the things which are needed for the body, what does it profit? Thus also faith by itself, if it does not have works, is dead. But someone will say, “You have faith, and I have works.” Show me your faith without [f]your works, and I will show you my faith by [g]my works. James 2:14-18

The ministry of disaster relief models the ministry of Jesus. Jesus would see a physical need and seek to meet their need so He could show them their greater need: their spiritual need.

Kentucky Baptist Disaster Relief volunteers are some of the most dedicated, selfless, and faithful servants I have ever seen. Just like Jesus who was moved with compassion to those in need, Kentucky Baptist disaster relief volunteers are moved with compassion to those affected by disasters and are ready to respond.

I am often reminded of Stan. Stan’s family attended church, but he was very independent and did not need Jesus. He believed church could make you a better person, so he sent the family, but he did not need anyone to help him. Following a severe ice storm, Stan was caring for his wife who was battling cancer and their four grandchildren they had adopted. Their power had been out for over a week, and he was getting tired. I made several offers for them to come to the church and let us help. He would always tell me “No, we take care of ourselves.”

A few days later, Stan finally reached a breaking point and brought his family to the church for warmth and rest. Several of those gold shirt volunteers began to love on them and get them whatever they needed. They served them selflessly. Stan watched with amazement how these volunteers just did whatever needed done with eagerness and a smile. He had never witnessed anything like this before.

A few days of watching this, Stan said he needed to talk to someone, “Right now!” One of the chaplains took him aside and asked what he needed. Stan replied, “I have never in my life witnessed such love as I have with all of these gold shirts. They have something I do not have, and I want what they have.” The chaplain shared with Stan the Gospel message, and Stan prayed to receive Jesus as his Lord and Savior. His life was dramatically changed!

I have watched so many of our volunteers in those gold shirts work hard, serve faithfully, and love generously without ever expecting anything in return. They model true servanthood.

I see them work hard all day and drag in exhausted in the evening. The feeding crew who had also been working hard all-day preparing meals, serves these volunteers. It’s not long, everyone is laughing, celebrating what God did that day, sing songs of praise, and sleep hard only to get up with eagerness to serve another day.

They understand God had set up these diving appointments and they cannot wait to see what will happen next. God has a plan. It may be a meeting at a gas station, at restaurant, in Wal-Mart or in someone’s back yard. But they are there. Ready to serve.

To the world it seems like foolishness. But to those who have experienced it, it is life changing; it is amazing; and it is incredible.

They love to work together, serve together, and pray together. They are eager to learn, to train, and to train others. They are truly the hands and feet of Jesus, ready to go across town, across the state, across the nation, or even around the world. Just like Isaiah said, “Here am I, send me.” (Isa. 6:8).

Many of them use their own equipment or vehicle; take their own vacation time to serve to help others; take time away from family or their own needs at home to serve others. It is in their heart.

So, next time you see someone in the gold shirt, let them know how much you appreciate them .

Everyone can pray. Pray for this ministry and these volunteers as they serve.

Most can give. Your generous gifts help provide the resources needed to care for others in times of disaster. Your giving allows us to go; to provide the chainsaws, the kitchens, the trailers, the tarps, supplies, training, and so much more. And as you give through the Cooperative Program, you support this wonderful ministry.

Some can go. Will you pray about and consider becoming a Kentucky Baptist Disaster Relief volunteer? It will change your life.

This ministry not only models the ministry of Jesus Christ, but it demonstrates the cooperative spirit of the Christian. We are a family.

THANK YOU!



Pray for Ukraine…and Give

Pray for Ukraine. We hear those words often and our hearts break for them and we are moved with compassion. We want to do something, anything to make a difference.


As I look at the images we see on the news and online, I often have no words. There are no words to describe my thoughts, my emotions, and the evil we are seeing happening in our world. I do not feel what these people feel, I have not experienced what these people are experiencing, I am not displaced as these people are, and I am not hurting and scared as these people are. Yet, my heart breaks for them.

As of May 1, 2022, around 13.2 million people – approximately 30.5% of the Ukrainian population – have been forcibly displaced by the ongoing military offensive, including 7.7 million internally displaced and 5.5 million displaced across international borders.

According to the revised estimations, over 24 million people – more than half of Ukraine’s population – will need humanitarian assistance in the months ahead, about 8 million more than estimated less than two months ago. It includes 15.7 million inside Ukraine, whose access to vital necessities have been impacted due to massive destruction of civilian infrastructure, the consequent displacement, and dramatic loss of jobs and livelihoods.

Send Relief continues to be in contact with company and national partners on the ground and Send Relief’s response to this major crisis continues to rise. Send Relief began responding with food relief before the invasion and continues to collaborate with national partners and Baptist Union leaders to provide food, shelter, transportation, medical supplies, clothing, and trauma ministry to those displaced and impacted by the crisis. Send Relief has continued to expand response to displaced people and is now assisting in Ukraine, Poland, Moldova, Hungary, Romania, Estonia, Latvia, Lithuania, Germany, Bulgaria, Czech Republic, Macedonia, Slovenia, and Italy. SBDR disaster response teams have deployed to Poland and Romania, and Send Relief continues to work with field leaders to deploy SBDR and other volunteer teams. SBDR state conventions currently active or in process of activating: North Carolina Baptists on Mission, Texas Baptist Men, Mississippi, Louisiana, Kentucky, Ohio, Southern Baptist Texas Convention, Georgia, Missouri, California, Arkansas, South Carolina, and Alabama.

Current projects: Send Relief continues to work in 14 countries and has 42 current relief projects funded through company partners, state convention partners, and Baptist Union partners. Ministry is happening with the support of many Southern Baptists.

So, what can we do? How can we help? Pray for the Ukrainians…and give.

Prayer Requests:
• Pray for peace in Ukraine and Russia.
• Pray for increasing numbers of people being displaced.
• Pray for the rising numbers of refugees in Western Ukraine, many who do not want to leave their country.
• Pray for those unable to leave war ravaged areas of Ukraine who are increasingly in need of basic life sustaining supplies.
• Pray for God to change the hearts of those in power in Russia.
• Pray for God’s protection for believers serving and ministering on the front lines of this crisis.
• Pray for those suffering in the areas of active conflict and for those who have lost loved ones.
• Pray that God will open people to the hope of Christ through this difficult season in their lives.
• Pray that the displaced can find a shelter and basic needs as they flee from the conflict.
• Pray for minority groups being displaced, who are often forgotten and disenfranchised.
• Pray for women and children displaced from home without husbands and fathers, who are often the primary providers in these families.
• Pray that children will be protected from those who might seek to harm or exploit them during this crisis.
• Pray that partners and the local church will have wisdom and strength during this time.
• Pray for local churches and partners in Poland, Moldova, Hungary, Romania, Latvia, Lithuania, Estonia, Italy, Bulgaria, Czech Republic, and Germany as they seek to help those fleeing and traumatized by war.
• Pray for the SBDR response teams and other volunteer teams as they serve in response.
• Pray that as we serve together and offer compassionate ministry in these difficult circumstances that all we do would glorify our great Lord and Savior.

Everyone can pray. Most can give and you can support the Ukrainian relief effort by visiting www.kybaptist.org/Ukraine. Some can go. Pray for our Kentucky Baptists scheduled to go in the coming weeks. Give to support this work.

“Brethren, pray for us” 1 Thessalonians 5:25









Called to Make a Difference

God has always called His people to make a difference. God has always been a “sending God” where we are called to be sent. We find all through Scripture, and especially in the life of Jeremiah the prophet of being called and sent by God.

As God is calling Jeremiah, He points out to Jeremiah in chapter 1 verse 7, “Because everywhere I send you, you shall go, and all that I command you, you shall speak.”

God called Jeremiah to be a voice calling people to a relationship to God. What is God calling you to? There are four things I want to point out:

First, There is a Call to be Responded To. God’s call on our lives is always a personal call. He does not call us all the same way for the same purpose, but His call to us is always personal.

• He called Noah in a personal way.
• He called Abram in a personal way.
• He called Moses in a personal and unique way.
• He called Samuel in a personal way in the middle of the night.
• He called Jeremiah in a personal way when he was a young man.
• He called Saul in a very personal and unexpected way.

Jesus calls us and He calls us by name in a personal and specific way, each unique.

The call from God to be responded to is two-fold: to a relationship with Him and to be on mission for Him.

Second, There is a Commission to be Committed To. God called Jeremiah to be a spokesman to the people. This was his commission to be committed to.

Every Christian has a commission to be committed to (Matt. 28:19-20). And just as God told Jeremiah, “Now, I have put my words in your mouth.” The first words God puts in the mouth of any Christian are the words of his/her testimony – a testimony of how God changed your life.

There is also another commission we must be committed to and that is the mission God has assigned to you personally. As the Scripture compares the members to a body (1 Cor. 12), we all have part that we are called and assigned to in God’s plan. We must be committed to the commission we are assigned.

Third, There is a Caution to be Alerted To. In Jeremiah 1:17 God gives him a caution. God was warning Jeremiah not to be more concerned with making excuses for not carrying out the commission than about obedience to fulfilling the call.

We are all full of excuses.
• It is the preacher’s job.
• It is not my gift.
• I witness by my life.
• I am too busy.

However, we should always remain obedient to the call. I am reminded of the words of the old hymn, “Trust and obey, for there’s no other way, to be happy in Jesus. But to trust and obey.”

Yes, it is just that simple. Not always easy, but it is simple.

Finally, There is a Command to be Obedient To. When God calls a person to follow Him and to answer His call, He expects not dialogue, not discussion, nor debate; but simply obedience.
The Psalmist said, “I have inclined my heart to perform Thy statutes.” Psalm 119:112

Jesus said in John 14:23, “If anyone loves me, he will keep My word; and My Father will love him, and We will come to him, and make Our abode with him.”

Have you been called to make a difference? Are you committed to following His command?

GO! And make a difference in the world around you.

Reaching Others Through Evangelism and Missions

I remember several years ago overhearing two pastors discuss evangelism vs. missions and which should be the focus of the church. One pastor thought all the focus had to be on evangelism. After all, are we not about the Great Commission and sharing the Gospel? The other pastor argued it had to be about missions. After all, didn’t Paul and others take many missionary journeys? Paul and his companions were always on mission.

I am not sure how each pastor defined these terms in their own mind, but evangelism is spreading the Gospel by preaching or personal witness. Missions involves the calling to go out and spread the Word of one’s faith. Those terms seem very similar to me, yet maybe different in context.

Organizationally we may separate them as evangelism does involve equipping and training, which is a biblical mandate (Eph. 4:12). Missions involves going out and being involved; this too is a biblical mandate (Matt. 28:19-20).

In the church I grew up in, it seemed when you said the word “evangelism,” the picture which came to mind was going door to door creating anxiety in many minds. Whereas the word “missions,” a picture which came to mind was sending a check to the Cooperative Program, Annie Armstrong Easter offering, Lottie Moon Christmas offering, and state mission offering. Maybe a local mission project from time to time might be included.

In my mind, you cannot separate evangelism and missions. They go together. If we refer to the definition of the two terms, if you are evangelizing, you are on mission. If you are going on mission, what is the point unless you see the opportunity to preach or share your personal testimony? I don’t know about you, but I don’t need something else to do for the sake of doing it. But ministry the work of motivates us to be on mission and evangelize. Because of our going and doing, we have the opportunity of serving and sharing.

That is why I love the disaster relief ministry. I see how it models the ministry of the Lord Jesus Christ. Jesus was on mission and Jesus evangelized. As you read and study His ministry, very often you see how He met the physical needs of someone, which would then open the opportunity for Him to share their greatest need, their spiritual need.

Often people will ask me when we are on a disaster response helping clean up after a storm, “How much does this cost?” I often will answer with, “It has already been paid for.” This confuses them for a moment, but that answer opens the door to share the Gospel, as Jesus paid it all.

I remember the story in the Bible when Jesus “had to go to Samaria.” (John 4:4). He had a calling to go there (missions), and an opportunity to share the Gospel (evangelism). Jesus called Zacchaeus down from the tree and went to his house. Jesus went to his house (missions) and shared the Gospel (evangelism). Because of His mission, He changed lives with the Good News.

If we are to be followers and ambassadors of the Lord, then we should do as He did. And obey as He did. We are to “go” as we are sent; “do” as we are given opportunity; “be” what He has made us; and share the reason of our hope: Jesus Christ.

Going and sharing. Sharing and going. Evangelism and missions. They go together. And as we go, we will reach the world for Christ.

Working Together

The Cooperative Program of the Southern Baptist Convention is one of the greatest things that unites us as churches across our convention. As each individual gives of their tithes and offerings through their local church, their church sends a portion of money to the Cooperative Program. This money is used to support our missionaries, ministries, church plants, compassion ministries, and the list goes on. Cooperatively, we can do far more together than we could ever do on our own.

The dollars and cents are easy to calculate and report as those funds are distributed. But what is even more visible, is when Southern Baptists unite together in service and assist those in need. We have witnessed firsthand during the December storms that affected Kentucky across our state the Cooperative Program in action. There were the tornadoes in western and south-central Kentucky, with flooding in eastern Pike County.

This is where we could see the Cooperative Program not just funded, but lived out. During this time of disaster response, Kentucky has been blessed not only by so many of our own church members stepping up to help, but so many from countless states who have come to help. And it makes a difference. Disaster relief teams from several of our neighboring states assisted us during this response.

Our disaster relief volunteers have responded in some very cold, dirty, and unpleasant places. They have taken their time, vacations, and even their own money to help others who are hurting. But this is what they train for. This is what they prepare for. And lives are changed.

For example, there were two elderly ladies whose home had flooded. With no one to help them and no where to go, they continued to live in their wet and dirty home, sleeping on a wet bed for nearly a week. A Kentucky and West Virginia Baptist disaster relief team arrived and discovered this need. Within hours, two beds, frames, sheets, pillows, and blankets were brought to their home, and they once again had a dry bed to sleep in. They assisted them with cleaning up their home and made a difference. This is the Cooperative Program lived out.

Our cooperative giving makes a difference. Our cooperative praying makes a difference. Our cooperative sharing makes a difference. And our cooperative serving makes a difference.

Don’t wait for another disaster or crisis to get involved. There are two spring disaster relief trainings coming up in March and April. Check out the web site at www.kybaptist.org/dr for more information and details. Be prepared to work together. Be prepared to make a difference.

Disruptions Along the Road

I was driving down the road the other day and noticed some bad spots in the asphalt right in the driving lane. It is obvious it will not take long for potholes to develop and cause some serious repair issues. It’s on a road I travel often, and I happen to think to myself, “One of these days, they will have to block traffic to make those necessary repairs. It will surely disrupt traffic and I hope it’s not on a day when I’m coming through.” (A little selfish thought, I know.) Those trained and with the appropriate equipment will come and do the necessary work for the road to be restored.

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I continued thinking through the scenario on the rest of my drive home. We all like it when things go our way and life is smooth. But for the appropriate repairs to be made, it will disrupt the traffic for a time. However, we would all agree, once the repairs are made and traffic is no longer disrupted, the condition of the road is much better than before. I’m grateful to those who are trained and can make the necessary repairs.

I thought even further about how disasters are similar. We like it when life is smooth and going our way. We don’t like any disruptions in our schedule or plans. However, we know disruptions come in many forms. And sometimes, disasters happen, disrupting and completely changing our lives.

There will be a time when our “traffic pattern” will have to stop so we can deal with the mess, the repairs or situation, and the time involved depends on the severity of the disruption or disaster.

Kentucky Baptists is blessed to have dedicated disaster relief volunteers who are trained, equipped, and have the necessary equipment to assist those who have experienced disaster. I’m grateful for all of them. They can assist with cleaning flooded homes. Clearing downed trees. Provide hot meals and hot showers. Wash dirty clothes. Care for children. Minister to those emotionally and spiritually struggling. And make a difference.

In the end, after the cleanup and rebuild, things are much better than before. It causes a disruption and difficulty through the process, but new relationships are formed, encouragement is experienced, and God is glorified.

It is amazing what an encouraging word and a prayer can do to change lives. Maybe we need to reflect and be thankful for the disruptions we experience in our lives. I’m reminded of Romans 8:28, “And we know that all things work together for good to those who love God, to those who are the called according to His purpose.” When God is in it, it always works for good.

If you want to learn more about Kentucky Baptist Disaster Relief ministry, give to support the work, or discover how you can become an KYDR volunteer, please visit www.kybaptist.org/dr.

“And whoever gives one of these little ones only a cup of cold water in the name of a disciple, assuredly, I say to you, he shall by no means lose his reward.” Matthew 10:42