Lessons From My Daughter’s Adoption

holly-cryingMy wife and I recently returned from adopting our two year old daughter in Ethiopia.  We began this journey nearly four and a half years ago.  We spent just under three weeks in Ethiopia finalizing the adoption and returned the week before Christmas.  While I still have much to process about this experience, here are some lessons I have learned thus far about our adoption journey.

  1. Adoption is hard.  Many may see adoption as a glamorous picture, but the reality is that adoption is hard on everyone involved.  The family adopting as well as the child being adopted all experience the challenges of this journey.  There are many highs and lows throughout the process.  Good news is often accompanied by not so good news.  Learning to trust in God’s timing and plan is necessary.
  2. Adoption is a picture of the gospel.  Paul says we “have received the Spirit of adoption as sons, by whom we cry, ‘Abba! Father'” (Rom 8:15)!  Abba Father is a personal and intimate term only those who belong to God can use.  We are able to call God our Father because we have received the Spirit through faith in Jesus.  We once were not children of God, but now we have been brought into His family through Jesus.  Our daughter, too, once had no family of her own, but now belongs to our family and calls me “daddy.”
  3. Adoption is a relentless pursuit.  When my wife and I began this journey four and a half years ago, we did not realize how relentless we must be.  We said we would pursue our daughter no matter the cost or challenge, but we had no idea what that would entail.  On the day that we met our daughter for the first time, she ran away from us crying.  She wanted nothing to do with us…at first.  We were not deterred by her resistance.  In fact, we were determined all the more to pursue her.  Oh, how this pursuit reminds me of God’s pursuit of us.  Though we wanted nothing to do with God, He pursued us at all cost (Titus 3:3-7).
  4. Adoption is permanent.  On the day of our court appointment with the judge, he asked us if we realized that this adoption is permanent. “Absolutely!” we replied.  Our daughter, on that day, became a permanent part of our family.  While in God’s plan this was certain before time, on that court date it became a realized reality.  She is now part of her forever family.  Again, what a reminder of God’s permanent adoption of us into His family.  Nothing can separate us from His love (Rom 8:31-39).

family-picWhile I will continue to learn lessons from my daughter, I am grateful for these past few weeks with her.  Adoption is not easy, but neither was the cross.  In order to bring us into His family, God gave everything (John 3:16).  He relentlessly pursued us in order bring us into His forever family.

What Stirs Your Heart?

I have an inflammation of the heart.  I have discovered that my condition can be contagious. It all started 32 years ago, when I led a team to central Mexico, as a young youth minister.  Don’t worry, my heart condition is not fatal.  My heart was set aflame in Mexico for “Missions”, and my life has never been quite the same.

Young girl from South Sudan who came to Christ through a disaster relief response, IMB partners, and medical missions.

Young girl from South Sudan who came to Christ through a disaster relief response, IMB partners, and medical missions.

Jesus instructed every one of His followers to, “Go, therefore, and make disciples of all nations, baptizing them in the name of the Father and of the Son and of the Holy Spirit, teaching them to observe everything that I have commanded you.  And remember, I am with you always, to the end of the age” (Matthew 28:19-20).  As followers of Jesus Christ, this is our Great Commission.  This, above all else, should burn in our hearts.

Today, my heart is inflamed by these facts:

  1. There are approximately 7.4 billion people in our world.
  2. About 54% of the world lives in urban areas.  By the year 2050, this may increase to 66%.
  3. The 5 largest cities in the world are Tokyo, New York City, Sao Paulo, Seoul, and Mexico City.
  4. Around 60% of the world lives in Asia.
  5. More than 1.3 billion people live in extreme poverty.  These people live on less than a $1.25 per day.
  6. Every 20 seconds a child dies from issues related to unclean water.
  7. There are approximately 210 million orphans across the globe.  Of the 17 million children, who have lost one or both of their parents to HIV-AIDS, 90% live in Sub-Sahara Africa.
  8. There are 795 million people chronically malnourished around the world.  In Sub-Saharan Africa, 1 in 4 people go to bed hungry every night.
  9. Close to 3 billion people are unreached in our world with no or very little access to the Gospel.
  10. Over 5 Billion people live today without a relationship to Jesus Christ and with no hope for eternity.
  11. The average Southern Baptist gives less than $10 to the Lottie Moon Christmas offering for International Missions.  Many churches give far less than a tithe to the Cooperative Program, which is still the lifeblood of our mission program.

What stirs your heart today?

May our hearts be set aflame by God to:

Go on Mission for Christ.

Give generously to the Lottie Moon Offering for International Missions.

Pray that every person be given the opportunity to hear the Good News of a Savior.

“But when Jesus saw the multitudes, He was moved with compassion for them, because they were weary and scattered, like sheep having no shepherd” (Matthew 9:36).

Christmas Memories


I love Christmas.  As the song says, it is truly “the most wonderful time of the year.”  There is just a special spirit at this season that in unlike any other.  The sights and sounds of Christmas seem to bring out the child in all of us.

Our trees are put up, nativity and carolers in place, advent candles on the table, and Christmas music playing.   Christmas parades, complete with marching bands and Santa Claus, are in almost every town.  There are Christmas parties and church programs to attend, Christmas cards, shopping, and gifts wrapped in pretty paper and bows.

Christmas to me is family.  It was always a special time at our house as we planned our family gathering, the food we would eat, baking and candy making, giving and receiving gifts, and just being together.

One of the most memorable gifts I received as a young toddler was a baby doll.  I do not remember the doll as much as the homemade cradle that my dad made, and the quilt and pillow that my mother made for my doll.  These were special gifts because of the extra love my parents had for me as they “made” these gifts.

Another memorable gift was the bicycle I received from an older sister when I was six years old.  It was my first year of school and her first year to teach school.  This was a gift that I enjoyed for many, many years.

One of my favorite parts of Christmas is the music.  I recall Christmas band concerts and parades, and the church Christmas programs that I was a part of.  As a college student at Eastern Kentucky University I looked so forward each year to attending the performance of the “Messiah.”

And the memories go on and on.  We all have our Christmas memories and traditions.  But, with everything we do, let’s never forget that we have Christmas because of Jesus.  I never remember a Christmas in our house that the true meaning of Christmas was not at the forefront.

With all we do this Christmas let’s be sure to include Him in our celebrations.  Include Him in our decorations, in the cards we send, and in the music we sing. Let’s include Him in our greetings to people as we smile and say “Merry Christmas.”

Christmas is a time when more people seem to be open to hearing the true story of Christmas, so let us be ready to share that message.  It may just cause someone to receive the special Gift of Christmas.

Gift Idea for the Person Who Has Everything

Christmas is a very special time of the year.  I love the music, lights and decorations, time with family, baked goodies and gift giving.  I really enjoy giving special gifts to those I love.  But not just any gift, the perfect one.  The one that is just what they needed or really wanted.   But what do you give to the person who has everything?Christmas Shopping stress pic

Several years ago, my parents announced that they would no longer receive gifts from us at Christmas because they “had everything they needed”.  Rather than give them a Christmas gift, they requested that we give to a ministry or charity in their honor.   A meaningful tradition was begun that continues today.  We have given animals for farmers in Haiti, transportation for pastors in Africa, shelter for the homeless in the US, and job training for the poor in eastern KY.  Although these are good gifts that bless others and honor my parents, we consider the most important gift each year to be the one we give to the Lottie Moon Christmas Offering.  If you’re not familiar with this offering, it is collected by the SBC International Mission Board in December for the support of more than 3,651 missionaries sharing the Gospel in countries all over the world.  Every single penny given goes directly toward the support and equipping of the missionaries because necessary administrative costs are covered by other means.

The missionaries supported by the Lottie Moon Christmas Offering are committed to giving themselves totally and selflessly toward reaching unengaged and unreached people groups who have nothing, because they don’t have Jesus, who is “everything”.  So, if you’re struggling with what to get the person who has everything, why not give a gift in their honor to the Lottie Moon Christmas Offering.  That way, instead of giving an unneeded gift to someone who has everything, you’re giving the gift of “everything” to someone who has nothing.   For more information, visit  www.imb.org/offering.