Backpacks Provide Hope for Children at Christmas

17.3 million of the children in the U.S. live in poverty, trapped by circumstances beyond their control.  Almost 1 million of them live in Kentucky, where 26% of our children under the age of 18 live in poverty.  That means that for 1 out of 4 children, Christmas doesn’t always come with the promise of gifts—or even a Christmas meal. Every day is more about survival than celebration. But we can help change that.

One very practical way that Kentucky Baptists can reach compassionately the needy children in our state is through the Christmas Backpack Project. Last year, there were over 50,000 backpacks distributed in 13 states by missionaries and church planters, and 15,000 of those went to children in KY.  Each backpack is a tangible expression of God’s love – and is filled with gifts of clothing, toys and food items. But the greatest gift in each backpack is a copy of the true Christmas story.  It may hard to believe, but many children have never heard the Biblical account of the true Christmas story.

Last year, there were over 1,500 decisions for Christ as a result of the gospel message that is shared with each backpack.  An exciting thing about those decisions is that many of them were made by parents and grandparents of the children receiving the backpacks.  The backpacks don’t just provide hope to a needy child, they impact the whole family.

A little girl named Gracie received a backpack and sent the following thank you note:  Thank you for the backpacks. I’m so thankful for all the cool stuff I got. My friend and I both got some gloves and a Holy Bible. We are reading the Bible together. Thank you!”

When the backpacks are received by children living in difficult circumstances, not only are the children and their families affected, so are those who prepare and pack the backpacks.  Many churches report that their whole congregation was involved in this ministry, young and old, including those who can’t travel on a mission trip. Some churches reported that working together on the backpacks helped them to focus outwardly on the needs of others rather than upon internal church issues.

Evangelist Dwight L. Moody said, “If I could relive my life, I would devote my entire ministry to reaching children for God!”   How devoted are you to reaching children for God?

Let me challenge you and your church to commit to preparing and packing backpacks for children to receive this Christmas.  It all starts with you – but ends in someone coming to know Jesus Christ and the true Christmas story.

For more information, or to register your church’s participation in the Christmas Backpack Project, visit:  www.kybaptist.org/backpacks

The Bucket Project

Kentucky Baptist churches will help open many doors for the gospel by packing buckets with hospice supplies and delivering them to the convention’s annual meeting in November.

Kentucky Baptists are again participating with Baptist Global Response to provide hospice care buckets to help families care for those with HIV/AIDS.  Buckets will be collected at the Kentucky Baptist Convention, Nov. 15, 2016, at Florence Baptist Church.

Our goal is to collect 2000 buckets at the annual meeting.

Here is  a recent testimony of a bucket’s impact in the African mountains of Lesotho:

lesotho-new-believerPartnership at work: International Mission Board, Baptist Global Response, Kentucky Baptist Disaster Relief, Churches in the US, Reclaimed Ministry.

A child, soon to be an orphan, experiencing compassionate love from a Reclaimed worker.  An International Mission Board nurse caring for a sick and dying mother.  A hospice bucket packed by a Southern Baptist Church in the US and delivered by Baptist Global Response.  A Kentucky Baptist Disaster Relief volunteer responding on a famine relief team with a willing spirit to go to a dying home…the result?

A good and great God brought it all together and now a dying momma belongs to Him!  

Priceless!

One kit costs between $80 to $100, plus shipping costs.  A detailed shopping list is provided and has been revised from prior years.  All kits must include all of the requested items.  Some items listed are available in bulk or are only available in quantities larger than needed.  For example, if after competing five kits, you have 10 extra packs of straws, include all extras in a separate box marked “EXTRAS.”

For uniformity in packing and shipping, as well as customs approval in recipient countries, please only provide completed kits that match the detailed list.  Varying kits and materials may delay shipments and, in some cases, may mean that the kits will not be accepted into a country.  Please refrain from adding notes, cards, letters, or tracts as this can also cause customs issues.

Click here for the shopping list

Click here for instructions for packing buckets. Please use this method when packing your buckets

“Urgency should always accompany the gospel message, and nowhere is that more evident than among the millions of people infected with HIV,” said KBC Executive Director Paul Chitwood. “By providing hospice buckets to be distributed by our missionaries, Kentucky Baptists have the opportunity to show the love of Jesus to those who are suffering and share with them the hope of the gospel.”

Have you packed your bucket?

For I Wasn’t Hungry…

Several years ago, I came home from work complaining about how hungry I was.  My wife was fixing dinner and the girls were working on homework at the kitchen table.  They asked if I had eaten lunch today. To which I replied, yes, but I haven’t had anything since lunch. They laughed at my foolish reply because no one else had eaten since lunch either.  I was embarrassed by my response because it had only been hours since I’d eaten, but I acted as if I were starving.  Truth is, I’ve never been starving, but there are those for whom starvation is a reality.

hunger-child-groceriesAlmost 800 million people around the world live with constant hunger, and 1 in 6 people in the US are food insecure, meaning, they don’t know where their next meal is coming from. The tragedy of hunger is very real for many of our churches and their communities. We all wish hunger would go away, but it isn’t going anywhere and the church has a clear command in scripture to feed the hungry (1 John 3:17-18 & James 2:5-17).

The Southern Baptist Convention’s Global Hunger Relief is a very effective funding system, put in place to assist ministries and churches in feeding the hungry.  80% of the hunger relief funds are used internationally while 20% are distributed within North America. 100% of every dollar given to Global Hunger Relief goes directly for the purchase of food.  None of it is used for promotion, administration, transportation, or operation costs.

The Global Hunger Relief offering has helped rescue starving children in West Africa, provided food for forcibly displaced refugees and given hope through backpacks filled with food to children in Appalachia.  SBC hunger relief ministries provide food to the hungry and offer the Bread of Life to them as well. There were over 21,000 professions of faith as a result of hunger ministries throughout the world. That includes 142 decisions for Christ last year in Kentucky as a direct result of hunger relief ministries.

Even though we have an effective hunger relief funding system in place and every penny of every dollar goes only toward the purchase of food –  it’s still not enough because the average Kentucky Baptist church member gave less than the cost of a canned soft drink to hunger relief last year.

Southern Baptists have set aside October 9th as Hunger Relief Sunday.  Let me challenge you and your church to step up it’s giving to the Global Hunger Relief offering. Raise awareness of the offering and how it helps relieve hunger.  Encourage friendly competition between small groups in your church.  Preach a sermon on hunger relief or prepare a children’s sermon for Sunday morning.  You’ll find resources to help with these suggestions at:  www.kybaptist.org/hunger

The next time you start to say, I’m starving, stop and remember that you aren’t. But, there are many others in the world, and in our neighborhoods, who are.