Evangelize the Unreached

Acts is a book about the advancement of the gospel (through the birthing of churches) as the Holy Spirit comes to dwell in the lives of Jesus followers. In fact, the Holy Spirit takes would-be cowards and transforms them into lion-hearted witnesses for Jesus. For example, Peter preaches his second sermon at the temple area in Acts 3.  Chapter 4 describes Peter and John being arrested for preaching the gospel.  Peter and John make it clear to the religious leaders who had arrested them that there is salvation in no one else but Jesus (Acts 4:12).  In the midst of hostility, Peter and John demonstrate gospel boldness.

The religious leaders are surprised by the confidence of Peter and John because they were uneducated men.  They further recognize that these two men had been with Jesus (Acts 4:13).  In order to squelch the boldness of Peter and John, the religious leaders threaten them to speak no more about Jesus (Acts 4:17).  You can imagine them being told that if they continue with their message, then they will do to them what was done to Jesus.  

Instead of cowering to the threat, Peter and John reply that they cannot help but speak about what they have seen and heard (Acts 4:20).  In other words, we cannot keep silent; we must not keep silent.  They are threatened again and released.

Peter and John gather back with the church and report all that had happened (Acts 4:23).  Peter’s and John’s gospel boldness comes through their confidence in a sovereign God (Acts 4:27-28).  Just as God was in sovereign control over the death of Jesus, He is also in charge of their lives.  Thus, gospel boldness is rooted not in ourselves, but in someone else.   

They pray, not for deliverance per say, but for boldness to proclaim the gospel more (Acts 4:29).  While we might think that their prayer would revolve around asking for a way out, they actually pray for boldness in the midst of hostility.  The gospel spreads from Jerusalem and beyond as the church prays, the Spirit fills, and the believers are emboldened. 

Why such a change from chapter 1 where the disciples are locked up in an upper room?  Well, it’s really quite simple.  Jesus was dead, but now He is alive . . . and they knew it.  Jesus left them in order that He might send another Comforter who would fill them with power (John 14; Acts 1:8).  Still yet, the disciples really believed that Jesus is the only way to be saved.  That means any other way besides through Jesus alone is no way at all.  They were gripped by this truth!  They lived, breathed, slept and ate this truth.  Men and women, boys and girls are eternally lost without Jesus.  Whether as an individual in a remote tribe in Indonesia who mixes animism with Islam or a cultural Christian in suburban Kentucky or a postmodern living in a mega city, all are lost who do not forsake their sin and trust in Jesus alone for salvation.

Ultimately, to be unreached is to not know Jesus as Savior and Lord.  Peter and John were gripped by the truth that Jesus alone saves.  They lived their lives seeking to make Him know, even if it cost them theirs.  May we, too, be gripped by the truth that Jesus alone saves and pray for gospel boldness to reach the unreached.        

How Can the Church Help Disaster Survivors?

Hurricanes

Floods

Wildfires

Earthquakes

Tornadoes

The year 2018 witnessed Hurricane Florence, Hurricane Michael,  the California Wildfires, the Indonesia Earthquake and Tsunami, the Guatemala Mount Fuego Eruption,  and Super Typhoon Manghut along with countless other smaller disaster events.  Each of these events caused significant loss that left people and communities reeling in the aftermath of these natural disasters.

What can we do as the church to help those suffering in times of disaster?

Here are the ten best ways to help survivors of disasters:

  1. Do not just show up to volunteer.  Spontaneous, untrained volunteers often make response more difficult for responders.  Disaster areas are often short on housing and food.  Those who just show up often rob these resources from those affected by the disaster, and often create issues that slow down rescue and recovery efforts.
  2. Get trained as a disaster relief volunteer.  Training enables you to respond at the right time and in the right way so that you provide real and effective help to survivors of disaster.  Kentucky Baptist Disaster Relief provides effective and positive ways to connect as a volunteer to help in times of disaster.  Learn more and register for a training at http://www.kybaptist.org/dr .
  3. Avoid the temptation to load up a tractor trailer with donated supplies unless you are connected with someone on the ground and meeting a specific request.  Disasters often become a receptacle for “guilt” giving or “make-myself-feel-good” giving.  It does not help communities devasted by disasters to barrage their communities with unwanted items or to ship them our junk.  Collecting stuff often causes further damage to communities by creating debris piles and the cost of disposing unwanted, unneeded truckloads of stuff.
  4. In most cases, monetary donations to reputable organizations are the best way to help those affected by disasters.  Monetary donations enable organizations to meet real needs in the best and most efficient way.  Ministering to disaster victims should be about meeting the needs of those affected, not making myself feel good.
  5. Avoid charity fraud.  Give to reputable organizations with a proven track record.  Donations through Kentucky Baptist Disaster Relief, Baptist Global Response, and Send Relief with the North American Mission Board are some of the best ways to offer help and hope to disaster survivors.
  6. Donate blood.
  7. Pray for those affected.  Prayer is always a right thing to do for hurting people.
  8. If the disaster is in the church’s community, the church can offer compassion by just reaching out to support our neighbors.  Listening to them and being with them in their pain and confusion brings God’s healing comfort.
  9. Meet practical needs.  Offer the church as a shelter.  Prepare meals or allow a Southern Baptist mobile kitchen to be set up at your church to provide meals.  Collect and reach out to families affected with Home Depot, Lowes, or Walmart gift cards.
  10. Plan and organize a community memorial service or worship event that allows families a safe place to find healing and comfort in their loss.

“Little children, we must not love with word or speech, but with truth and action.”

(1 John 3:18).