Do Not Be Alarmed

For most of us our world has changed in 2020.  Our world has been drastically altered by the COVID-19 pandemic.  We are washing our hands and using sanitizer more.  We are social distancing and wearing face masks as we try to not get too close to one another.  Many of us have stockpiled food, water, and even toilet paper.  We are weary of the nightly reports of stay-at-home extensions, new cases, death counts, and growing unemployment.  Most Americans believe that it will be a long time before things return to normal, and social media chirps constantly about the new norm.  As we begin the re-opening process, it appears the response to this deadly disease has left us with more questions than answers.

The pandemic has ground our economy to a halt, but it has not slowed the famine in Sub-Saharan Africa that has left millions starving.  It has not ended the Iranian – U.S. tensions that witnessed another close encounter in the Persian Gulf this week.  According to the United Nations Refugee Agency it has not decelerated the number of displaced people across our globe.  Nor has it curbed the active early tornado season that spawned over 100 twisters and left 73 people dead.

I do not claim to be an expert, but I think that I can accurately proclaim, life can be a dangerous venture.  The journey of life often passes through dark valleys.  Valleys that can leave us anxious, frightened, and insecure.  And many ponder “What if it all gets worse?”

As I read the Bible, I am thankful that God is honest with us.  Jesus shared with His disciples and reminds us that difficult days will come. He tells us in the Gospel of Matthew that there will be wars and rumors of wars, famines, pandemics, and natural disasters.  He predicts His church will be persecuted, people will turn on each other and spew hatred against their neighbor, false prophets will appear, and wickedness will increase.  Jesus shares that things are going to get worse before they get better. 

Yet do not miss an important word that Jesus shares with His followers right in the middle of this calamity-filled proclamation.  Jesus shares this key directive in Matthew 24:6 as he teaches about the coming tribulation, “See that you are not alarmed.”  This word “alarm” in the ancient language means “to wail, to cry out in despair, to be hysterical.”  Jesus counsels us when bad stuff comes, do not panic, or fall apart.  And He tells us why with His next words in this passage of Scripture, “because these things must take place.”

Must is a vital word in this passage because it asserts that all events, everything that takes place in this world, from the mundane to the chaotic are part of God’s plan.  God uses all things to accomplish His purposes and plans.  When the world seems to be careening out of control, be reminded that God is still on His throne, and our Lord has promised that He will never leave nor forsake us. He declares to us that trials and tribulations will come in this world and they are very real, but do not let these present troubles blind you to the fact that a better world is coming.  Jesus has formulated the predictive model for our world’s pandemic, and He has established a treatment plan that will cure all that is wrong in our present age.

If you have placed your faith in Christ, it will all work out in the end, and by His grace, He will get you through today and tomorrow. And by the way, if this world is a chaotic mess, be assured it is not yet the end.

Will COVID-19 Distract Us from the Vision?

The world’s attention has been on COVID-19 for the last several months. We’ve seen how the virus can be passed from person to person and we’re learning daily how to protect ourselves and those we love while creatively ministering in a constantly changing world of uncertainty. I’m concerned about those who might be infected with the virus, but I’m even more concerned about those who have yet to be infected with the love of Christ.

Prior to this “new normal” surrounding COVID-19, Southern Baptist Convention Executive Committee President Ronnie Floyd announced a five-year initiative to reach every person with the Gospel in every town, every city, every state and every nation. Vision 2025 contains five major strategic actions for the SBC to accomplish by 2025.  My prayer is that COVID-19 will not be a distraction from these goals. Now, more than ever, we must work together to bring this vision to fruition because the world is looking for hope that can only be found in Christ!

One of the goals is to increase the total number of full-time, fully funded missionaries by a net gain of 500, giving the SBC 4,200 full-time, fully funded missionaries through the International Mission Board (IMB).

I find this goal humbling and challenging because our new normal is something many of our missionaries content with every day in their ministry settings. While we’re dealing with a contagious virus for what is probably only a brief period of time, our missionaries serve in places where things such as infectious diseases, intestinal disorders, flesh eating bacteria, and parasites that cause fatal diseases, are common daily occurrences.

So, how will we callout and enlist those God is leading to serve?  What will we do to contribute toward an increased number of missionaries?  I believe this goal is attainable, but it’s going to take every pastor and church taking hold of it and doing their part locally.   

Here are some practical steps that each local pastor and church can take toward increasing the number of missionaries serving on the field:

1. PREACH sermons that challenge people to go – 21% of missionaries were called to serve as the result of a missions sermon in their local church.

2. AFFIRM those upon whom you recognize God is leading – to the one who is questioning his or her abilities, your words may be the confirmation they need to go.

3. HOST a missions conference – 20% of missionaries felt called to serve after listening to a missionary speak. 

4. PROMOTE missions offerings – we will only realize an increase in missionaries going when churches send the necessary financial resources to sustain their ministries.

5. SHARE what God is doing through our missionaries – how exciting and stimulating it is to hear stories or see videos that help us to understand what missionaries are doing and how they’re making a difference.

6. PARTNER with missionaries – going becomes more personal when over a period of 3-5 years when a church is Skyping, sending teams, providing prayer support and sharing ministry resources with specific missionaries.

7. LEAD your church to engage in a short-term missions experience – many full-time vocational missionaries were inspired to go and serve as the result of a short-term missions trip.

8. PRAY and lead your church to do so – the fields are ripe unto harvest and the need for missionaries is great.

I suspect the fears and concerns over COVID-19 will pass, but our concern for the lost who have yet to hear the hope of the Gospel should never pass. Satan poses a much greater risk to humanity than COVID-19, so we should work together to make the kingdoms of this world the Kingdom of our Lord.  If our desire is to see people from every nation come to know Him, then we should be willing to do all that we can to accomplish the goal of more people going as missionaries. 

Teach Me to Do Your Will During COVID-19

Kentucky Baptist Disaster Relief remains ready to respond during the COVID-19 pandemic and continues to partner with Kentucky Emergency Management and other responders. The pandemic has been unlike any previous crisis response and we have been forced to adapt and be creative in our response. For example, Kentucky Baptist Disaster Relief donated 12,150 N-95 masks to medical workers and facilities in Kentucky from our flood recovery inventory and prepared almost 6000 meals for children to fill a gap for a school system in Western Kentucky. This is not our typical ministry during a disaster, but it provided opportunities for us to be salt and light during this crisis.

When disasters create havoc in communities, churches along with Kentucky Baptist Disaster Relief are to be faithful and to minister with Godly compassion. The COVID-19 Pandemic has changed our ability to react in the same ways that we typically respond in times of disaster. Yet the church remains called by God to minister when our neighbors are hurting and overwhelmed.

Here are some thoughts for ministry during this time:

  1. Pray for our neighbors, and for God to bring healing to our state. Pray for opportunities to engage in spiritual conversations.
  2. Be agents of peace who calm rather than encourage panic.  God has not given us a spirit of fear, but of power, of love, and of sound mind.
  3. Seek to encourage others and to demonstrate the hope that we have in Christ. Many people are more open to Gospel conversations during seasons of crisis as they are awakened to the frailty of life.
  4. Develop a plan to check on the most vulnerable in your congregation and community. Those who might be ill, or who are at higher risk.  This does not have to be direct contact.  It could be by phone, text, or email.
  5. Develop a plan on how the church might deliver basic supplies to people in need.  This plan should include safety precautions so that we minister but minimize risk to those whom we are ministering.  We want to help those in need but not create risks that could further infect ourselves or others.
  6. Look for creative ways to worship, to share spiritual truths, to demonstrate compassion, and to minister in this unique time. This will require us to think out of the box, but it also creates opportunities to take the church beyond the four walls of our buildings.

Be reminded that the church has always been willing to run toward not away from times of crisis for the sake of Christ and our neighbors.  This is a difficult time that is causing many to be filled with anxiety and stress but is also a time for us as the church to demonstrate the peace, grace, and hope of Christ.

Finally, I would offer the words of the Psalmist,

Teach me to do Your will, for You are my God.  May Your gracious Spirit lead me on level ground” (Psalm 143:10).

The psalmist confirmed obedience to God’s call but asked God to lead him in a way that his feet could be steady, and he would not fall.  This is great instruction as we plan to serve in times of crisis. As followers of Christ may we be those who demonstrate to a world shaken by this pandemic that our feet rest on the solid rock of Christ.

Creatively Meeting Needs During the COVID-19 Crisis

The COVID-19 pandemic has impacted every community and every element of our society.  Businesses, schools, organizations and even parks, are closed if they don’t provide what is considered an essential service.  Most people are sheltered in place, while those that do get out are forced to practice social distancing. 

The pandemic has impacted our medical system to the point that the demand for medical supplies and personal protection equipment outweighs the supply.  However, after understanding how great the need was, many stepped up to creatively meet the demand.  Factories retooled assembly lines, university classrooms manufactured face shields, and individuals sewed masks.  It’s inspiring to see people get so creative in order to meet the need of others.

Years ago, from about AD 249-262, the Plague of Cyprian was a pandemic that spread throughout the Roman Empire.  It too, impacted every element of society and killed as many as 5,000 people per day in Rome.  During that time, the early church stepped up and effectively ministered when disease incapacitated a city.  So many people turned away from paganism because they saw how the church ministered to the poor and sick during that crisis! 

I believe the same could happen today if the world sees the church ministering during this crisis rather than only protecting itself. God is calling us to minister during this difficult time of crises so that people turn from lostness to Him.  Doing so, will require creativity on the part of the church, just as it did the factories and universities.  Let me encourage you to prayerfully consider how you will step up during this crisis and effectively meet needs while practicing social distancing and adhering to the guidelines given us by our elected officials. 

So how does the church serve as a witness for Christ and minister during these difficult days when there are so many restrictions needed to protect us, and others, from the virus?   Here are some ideas to consider:

  1. Prepare and deliver meals for those that can’t get out.
  2. Deliver needed supplies to the front porch of the elderly and most vulnerable.
  3. Sew masks for frontline workers.
  4. Leave a simple card on front doors that says, “Hello! If you are self-isolating, let me know how I can help.” Include your name and contact information.
  5. Serve as the host for a blood drive as blood is in short supply.
  6. Encourage medical personnel on the front lines with meals, thank you cards and prayers.
  7. Provide childcare for hospital staff members and first responders since day cares are closed.
  8. Deliver meals prepared by the local school to children receiving lunches as transportation may be a need.
  9. Take baked goods to neighbors and ask them if there’s anything you can do for them.
  10. Create videos of hope and place them on social media as an encouragement to others. 
  11. Provide a sense of connection to those in quarantine. If video calling isn’t an option, consider standing outside their storm door on the phone so they can see, as well as hear you.
  12. Call a frontline worker and offer to pray for them.
  13. Serve grab-and-go meals for the homeless while teaching social distancing and sharing hygiene tips.
  14. Children can write Bible verses and encouraging messages with sidewalk chalk on driveways in their neighborhood.

What will you do to minister during COVID-19? The need for the church to step up and meet the need of the community has never been greater.  Seek the Lord about how you can creatively press into this situation in strategic ways for the sake of His Kingdom.

Practical guide for family prayer and encouragement

Missions is a family affair. In Acts 2, the Bible records Peter’s powerful sermon on the day of Pentecost. As Peter was preaching, the Holy Spirt moved in the hearts of those who were listening. They pleaded with Peter, “What must we do to be saved?” Peter answered them and said, “Repent and be baptized!” 

As the people confessed their sins and became believers under the new covenant, Peter continued to explain that salvation was not only for them. As Peter explained in Acts 2:39, “For the promise is for you and your children and for all who are far off, as many as the Lord our God will call to Himself.” 


WATCH A VIDEO PRESENTATION


As a parent, I am always seeking to equip and encourage my family to live a life on mission. My wife and I pray and ask the Lord to teach us new ways to be intentional in fulfilling the Great Commission at home and in our community.


One simple way to be intentional in fulfilling the Great Commission is to pray for and encourage the Body of Christ. In the book of Acts, The Bible teaches us the importance of encouragement as it relates to the fulfillment of Great Commission. In Acts 14:21-23, the Bible says that “after they (Paul and Barnabas) had preached the gospel to that city and had made many disciples, they returned to Lystra and to Iconium and to Antioch, strengthening the souls of the disciples, encouraging them to continue in the faith, and say, “Through many tribulations we enter the Kingdom of God.” 

In the midst of this global trail and displacement from the coronavirus, here are some practical ways (or a practical way) you and your family can pray and encourage others in the Body of Christ:


Gather your family, read Acts 1:8, Acts 2:39, and Acts 14:21-23. Following the Acts 1:8 paradigm, let Jerusalem represent your local church and community, Judea (Kentucky), Samaria (North America), and Ends of the Earth (the world).

  • Jerusalem (Your Church and Community):
    1.  Pray, write a thank you card, short letter or email to your Pastor
    2. For younger kids, ask them, “Who is our pastor?” “How can we pray for him?” and have them write out or record their answers. Pray for your pastor and then let him know.
  • Judea (Your State: Kentucky):
    1. Teach your children to pray for a Kentucky Missionary.
    2. We have over 100 Kentucky Missionaries who need prayer and encouragement
    3. Go to the InterSeed website and download the monthly prayer calendar to pray for the missionaries across the state
    4. Email [email protected] to get a missionary contact info for encouragement
  • Samaria (North America):
    1. Teach your children to pray for our NAMB (North American Mission Board) missionaries.
    2. Share with them how our Baptist churches work together to fulfill the Great Commission through the cooperative program.
    3. Pray for these NAMB missionaries and Kentucky Baptist partners.
      1. Salt Lake City Bobby Wood
      2. Chicago: John Yi
      3. New York: Won Kwak (NAMB); George Russ (Metro NY Baptist Association)
      4. Cincinnati: Travis Smalley
    4. Email [email protected] to get a missionary contact for encouragement.
  • World (International Missions):
    1. Teach your children to pray for IMB Missionaries
    2. Go to the IMB website, click on one of the 9 Affinity groups around the world, watch the video, and use the pray guide as a family
    3. Pray for these IMB missionaries that the Kentucky Baptist are currently partnering with
      1. Sao Paulo: Aaron and Melissa Stormer; Scott and Joyce Pittman
      2. Zimbabwe: Nick and Kyndra Moore
      3. Central Asia: _____ (can’t give names, as you know, but the Lord knows)
    4. Email [email protected] to get a missionary contact for encouragement.


The key is to model for your children that our Faith and Hope is Christ, and that he will never live us or forsake us in the midst of trial. By taking time to pray and encourage your Pastor, Church leaders, or a missionary family today, you and your family will be participating in fulfilling the Great Commission! Perhaps, the Lord may open a new door for a Kingdom Partnership! 

You can download the Prayerwalking Guide and the Neughbor Survey from the Kentucky Baptist convention coronavirus resource page


JOHN BARNETT is a Kentucky Baptist Convention Missions Strategist. Reach him at [email protected]

Responding to the Coronavirus

The Coronavirus is creating stress and anxiety across our nation and all of us should continue to monitor this outbreak and be prepared to adjust as the situation evolves. We should take the outbreak very seriously but be sure of our facts and avoid panic.



Here are facts and safety tips about Coronavirus:
 

  1. There are many kinds of coronaviruses. Some cause colds and mild respiratory illnesses, but others are more severe.
  2. The Coronavirus that is causing issues is COVID-19 which is a more severe coronavirus.
  3. Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) is a respiratory illness that can spread from person to person. The virus that causes COVID-19 is a novel coronavirus that was first identified during an investigation into an outbreak in Wuhan, China.
  4. 94% of people who contract the disease have recovered with elderly and those with immune issues being the highest at risk.
  5. 99.5% of people who contract the flu recover with small children and those with immune issues being the highest at risk.
  6. Coronavirus symptoms are fever, cough, and shortness of breath that can begin 2-14 days after exposure.
  7. To prevent the spread of Coronavirus disinfect surfaces with bleach or shockwave or any areas that are frequently touched.
  8. Wash your hands for at least 20 seconds with soap and water.
  9. Use hand sanitizer that is alcohol based and that is at least 60% alcohol.
  10. Cover your mouth with arm if sneezing or coughing.
  11. Try to avoid touching your eyes, nose, or mouth with your hands.
  12. Please stay at home if you are sick, and especially if you have fever.
  13. Try to avoid contact with people who are sick.
  14. Facemasks will not guarantee prevention from getting respiratory virus but can help in not spreading virus.  Masks are best worn if you are sick or showing symptoms. Masks do add a layer of protection though not a guarantee so masks would be suggested if you are caring for someone who is showing symptoms.
  15. Practice other good health habits. Get plenty of sleep, be physically active, manage your stress, drink plenty of fluids and eat nutritious food.
  16. Higher risk groups for Coronavirus are older adults and people who have serious chronic medical conditions like heart disease, diabetes and lung disease and immune deficiencies.

Finally, do not forget that our lives rest in the Lord, and I offer you this encouragement today,

“The Lord is the One who will go before you.  He will be with you; He will not leave you or forsake you.  Do not be afraid or discouraged.”   (Deuteronomy 31:8)

Baptist Leaders Call for Unified Care for Displaced People

This is a big enough issue and a big opportunity for the church to be the church in some of the most strategic areas here in the states and across the world. I think there needs to be a voice coming from our convention that would provide a structure for what we’re doing so that our efforts would be unified.” JEFF PALMER, BAPTIST GLOBAL RESPONSE

The world is on the move. Millions of people live far from their homes but are able to stay connected with their family through the use of technology. Because of this, leaders from a number of Southern Baptist agencies, state conventions, local associations and churches believe the time is right for a strategic plan to reach these people on the move.

According to Jeff Palmer, CEO of Baptist Global Response (BGR), there are about 70 million who are displaced in the world today. “This means they can’t go home for some reason. It could be because of a natural disaster, a war, terrorism or even human trafficking,” he said.

Conversations between leaders at the Southern Baptist Convention’s International Mission Board and North American Mission Board along with leaders from the Woman’s Missionary Union, BGR, state conventions, local associations and churches led to a gathering on October 31, 2019 in Louisville, Kentucky, for a listening session on initiatives to reach displaced people.

The conversations didn’t end there. In fact, they’re stirring a greater desire for collaboration on every level.

“There’s a growing desire among Southern Baptist Convention entities to communicate more and collaborate better when it comes to serving displaced people,” said Trent DeLoach, Send Relief coordinator and pastor at Clarkston International Bible Church in Clarkston, Georgia. “We’ve had opportunities at the SBC’s annual meeting to share the stage with other entity leaders and have this conversation,” 

“There’s no shortage of great work that’s happening on all of these levels,” said Jeremy Simmons, National Ministry Center director with the North American Mission Board. “I think we’re really working toward communicating the need between each other.”

Leaders with the IMB believe Southern Baptists must recognize they are living in a world where people are connected with people in more than one country; living in one country while maintaining their unique identity from their country of origin.

Terry Sharp, IMB conventions and network relations leader, believes this is an opportunity for a truly global strategy in reaching displaced people. “An exciting thing to me would be to see churches engage with people groups overseas through missionaries, but then also engage those same people who have been displaced and relocated in North America. They can be working with them simultaneously both globally and in North America.”

John Barnett, missions strategist for the Kentucky Baptist Convention, says seeing this opportunity made an impact on him when his family returned to Kentucky after serving overseas with the International Mission Board. “One of the biggest impressions on me when we came back from overseas in 2015 was the internationals who were here. There were refugees in Louisville, Owensboro, Lexington and Bowling Green. We have an opportunity to build pathways here that will connect all the way back to the refugees home country.”

Building the pathway is the challenge, though. While the churches and entities are at work individually, the autonomous structure of Southern Baptist life can prove to be a challenge for collaboration.

Palmer believes, “This is a big enough issue and a big opportunity for the church to be the church in some of the most strategic areas here in the states and across the world. I think there needs to be a voice coming from our convention that would provide a structure for what we’re doing so that our efforts would be unified.”

Sharp echoes the sentiment, “We’re grateful for the Cooperative Program. We want to keep sending missionaries, but we hope Southern Baptists will realize that while we’re going to the nations, God is bringing them to us in the United States.”

Barnett recalls previous strategies to reach those in the “10/40 window. Ten years ago the International Mission Board was talking about engaging people in some of the most difficult places in the world. Now, God is spreading those people out all across the world. This is a wonderful time for the church to care for and to reach those people.”

Pray for the Lord’s wisdom and vision as leaders prepare for a second meeting in Atlanta on April 23, and get your church connected today. Here are some options to get started, you can visit our Displaced People Website http://www.kybaptist.org/stories/displaced-people,3748 and click one of the headings for next steps. Email John Barnett, KBC Missions Strategist, at [email protected] or call our team at 502-489-3529. The Missions Mobilization Team is here to serve you and your Church.

I’m Not Trained, But I Did Stay at a Holiday Inn Last Night

Believers often ask in Disaster Relief, “Why do I have to go through training to serve as a volunteer?  Why can’t I just go help people?”

Preparation is important in any area of ministry, because it enables us to be more effective in ministry.  The wisdom writer in Ecclesiastes 10:10 declared, “If the ax is dull, and one does not sharpen the edge, then he must use more strength, but wisdom brings success.” Sharpening the blade will enable the tool to be more efficient, just as training helps believers to serve more effectively in response to the survivors of disasters.  Through your gifts to the Cooperative Program, the Kentucky Baptist Convention is able to provide training in disaster relief that prepares Kentucky Baptists to be ready to serve in positive ways during times of disaster.

Top ten reasons to be trained:

  1. Training prepares us in our understanding of disasters and the needs that arise in times of disaster.
  2. Training enables us to respond in appropriate and effective ways.
  3. Training prepares us to understand our role as part of a team.
  4. Training enables us to sharpen our abilities, in order to be an asset not a hindrance in the response.
  5. Training helps us to understand hazards and safety concerns in disaster areas.
  6. Training prepares us to understand, in a deeper way, some of the trauma that victims face, so that we might be able to offer appropriate compassion.
  7. Training prepares the heart for ministry by increasing awareness of the need and different opportunities to minister.
  8. Training prepares the hands to be ready to serve effectively.
  9. Training prepares the head by gaining knowledge.
  10. The greatest reason to train is that God deserves our very best in all that we do.  In order to achieve this, discipline, effort, and knowledge are required.  Trainings are an opportunity to grow as believers, so that we are ready when God calls.

Several years ago, there was a popular commercial that showed a man preparing to do surgery when everyone began to realize that perhaps he was not up to the task.  The man’s response to their concern was, “I may not be a doctor, but I stayed at a Holiday Inn Express last night.”  I cannot answer for you, but I really do not want that man doing surgery on me. Yet, sometimes we are that way when it comes to ministry.  “Hey, I am not really prepared to minister to you, but I did stay at a Holiday Inn Express last night.”

Disasters will come.  Therefore, let me encourage you, be prepared to serve by being trained.  Victims deserve that.  Other disaster relief workers deserve that.  But most of all, our God deserves that!

Check out these opportunities for training in 2020:

  • February 8, 2020 at Edgewood Baptist Church in Nicholasville
  • March 7, 2020 at First Baptist Church of Paducah
  • April 4, 2020 at Hawesville Baptist Church
  • September 12, 2020 at Calvary Baptist Church in Glasgow

For more information or to register go to http://www.kybaptist.org/dr.

The Key to Success

How do you measure success?  The world looks at bank accounts, houses, prestige, degrees earned, or your position in the company.  The athletic world looks at scores, games won, and championships attained.  The church may look at membership rolls, worship attendance, the number of baptisms, or the size of buildings.  All of these things are indicators or “marks on the measuring rod”.  But true success is obedience to God.  How can you be more successful than obeying God who created and sustains us, and calls us to obediently join Him in the work?  

There are more than one hundred successful missionaries serving in Kentucky through the Mission Service Corps.   These Mission Service Corps missionaries are having an impact in all areas of ministry through local churches, institutions, associations and individual ministries.  In terms of ministry opportunities, the sky’s the limit with Mission Service Corps missionaries because each one has a special ministry that fits their giftedness and uniqueness.   Each missionary felt God’s calling on their life to do the specific ministry they’re involved in.  

Mission Service Corps missionaries are committed to long-term mission service (4 months or longer for at least 20 hours per week) and are either self-funded or supported by partners while on the mission field.   Successful Mission Service Corps applicants are carefully screened to serve in specific ministries and following approval, are commissioned and participate in an orientation prior to their placement. 

If you want to be obedient to God, and therefore successful, prayerfully consider if God wants you to be a Mission Service Corps missionary by asking yourself these questions:

  1. Have you felt an unusual moving and/or stirring of God in your heart? 
  2. Has God alerted you to see or hear of missions and/or ministries that you could perform?
  3. Has God placed in your heart a strong desire to help others?
  4. Are you available to serve, either by going someplace or by remaining at home? 
  5. Did the Lord call you previously to missions or a special service and you were not able to or did not respond?
  6. Has God assured you that He will provide enabling for all He may call you to do?

If you answered “yes” to several of these questions, you are aware of God working in your world and He may be calling you to serve as a Mission Service Corps missionary. 

Let me encourage you to…

  • seek guidance from God’s Word, 
  • talk to and pray with your pastor or Associational Mission Strategist, 
  • discuss your feelings with family members, and most importantly,
  • pray, asking God to show you what He is doing and how you can be a part of it.

          The genius of the Mission Service Corps missionary structure is that every Baptist can be directly involved in missions.  For some, involvement means responding to go;  for others, it is providing so that someone else may go.  For still others, being involved means praying for those who go and their partners; and for many it is a combination of these.   

          Mission Service Corps missionaries won’t climb the corporate ladder, become a celebrity, be featured on ESPN, or make as much as Bill Gates, but they will be successful if they serve the Lord with gladness by answering His call to go.  Will your response be, here am I, send me?   

Wise Instruction for a Leader

Good leaders are deciders. Leaders make decisions and move forward. They may not always be right, but they do not allow themselves to be paralyzed by indecision.

Great spiritual leadership recognizes the need for God to be integral in the process of decision-making. In Exodus 18: 19-21 Moses was given great leadership advice by his father-in-law Jethro, “Now listen to me; I will give you some advice, and God be with you. You be the one to represent the people before God and bring their cases to Him. Instruct them about the statutes and laws, and teach them the way to live and what they must do. But you should select from all the people able men, God-fearing, trustworthy, and hating bribes. Place them over the people as commanders of thousands, hundreds, fifties, and tens.”

This passage teaches us three great pastoral leadership principles:

  1. Bathe decisions in prayer. We should begin decision-making in prayer. If we are to lead God’s people effectively, we need to be a person of prayer. Our calling is to lead people to the place that God desires them to be, and to do that effectively we must stay close to God. Great leaders lead the people as they draw close to God and remain close to Him during the journey. Talk more to God about the church’s issues than you proclaim them from the pulpit.
  2. Base all you do on God’s truth. Godly leadership bases decisions on the truth, not personal opinions. We are called as spiritual leaders to teach the truth of God that He has revealed to us in His Holy Word. All we do should be based on the teachings of Scripture and our lives ought to seek to model these teachings. Any decision made that cannot find foundation in God’s Word will not stand the test of time and ultimately will fail.
  3. Share leadership with others whom God has gifted. Moses could not possibly do everything himself as he led the people of Israel, and neither can we. God does not call us to be Lone Ranger followers. Good leaders empower others to use their gifts and share leadership responsibilities with others. We can always do more together than any of us can do alone. Pastoral authority is not lessened in shared leadership, it is enhanced as we maximize the giftedness of the church and allow the followers of Christ opportunity to be used and to grow in their faith. Good leaders do not fear other mature believers having a voice in the decision-making process, and in wisdom welcome the input of others.

The called of God are to stand and lead. But that privilege only comes to those who have first followed. Therefore, speak after you have first sought a word from Him. Lead as you pursue His direction. Stand after spending time before His throne of grace. Be wise by seeking the input of other gifted followers of our God. And then issue the call to go boldly forward not by barking commands but by rallying the faithful to follow Our Commander and Lord.